Showing posts with label FAQ. Show all posts
Showing posts with label FAQ. Show all posts

Friday, September 9, 2016

Problems of Perfectionism

During the 2016 ABC USA Minister's Conference, where we explored options for maintaining healthy, balanced lives in the face of our challenging callings, the keynote speaker Dr. Jennifer Davidson warned us not to fall into the trap of perfectionism. Her warning is applicable to all of us, not just ministers.

The Merriam Webster Dictionary defines perfectionism as follows:

1. a : the doctrine that the perfection of moral character constitutes a person's highest good; b : the theological doctrine that a state of freedom from sin is attainable on earth

2: a disposition to regard anything short of perfection as unacceptable (see: 
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/perfectionism)

As Dr. Davidson stated, we need to stop placing heavy, unrealistic expectations on ourselves and instead of attempting to manage everything ourselves, turning control over to God instead. If we do not, we come to dislike ourselves when we don't meet those expectations. As a result, we will project that negative attitude upon others, making our dissatisfaction with our own imperfections about them rather than dealing with the issues honestly ourselves. 

Humility is the antidote to the myth of perfectionism that eats away at the heart of our spiritual lives, drowning that life in depression, sinking us into despair. If we feel we need to be perfect, we will certainly fail at the things we try, whether they be physical, intellectual, or spiritual matters. 

For me, the key observation was and remains "Perfectionism kills the ability to move forward. We won't try if we can't be perfect." That's what happens when we accept the corrosive myth of perfectionism. 

Author Joshua DuBois, referencing the parable of the shepherd searching for the lost sheep in Luke 15:4-7, remarks in The President's Devotional, "[Our God] is not a God who loves the righteous--because none are righteous, none. He's not a God who values those who have it all together, because who among us really does?" None of us manages to get through life without stumbling. None of us is perfect. 

Finally, author Kirk Byron Jones in his book, Rest in the Storm, warns that we cannot expect each other to be able to address (perfectly or otherwise) all of the problems we face in our sojourn through life. Jones quotes Dr. E.V. Hill's consideration of this matter. While this is a warning for pastors, once again it is good advice for everyone, "Now we need to be careful. Sometimes the expectation that we meet all these demands convinces us that we can. This can give us a messianic complex that is destructive to the preacher and the preacher's family. This messianic complex can work on us so that we can feel bad about not being able to solve all the problems that are brought to us. This is a horrible addiction. There is glamour and glee in thinking that you have the answer to many problems and feeling that others think so. It is very seductive, and we can become addicted to it. And it is subtle; we want to endear people to us, but this can lead to people expecting too much from us, and us expecting too much from ourselves." 

Let's all be humble. Let's all admit we are not perfect beings. Let's lower the expectations a bit, Let's get away from the idea that anything short of perfection is unacceptable. We'll all be healthier for that.

Wishing everyone peace ... and a healthy does of humility ... so we can all move forward together.  

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Friends Praying and Acting



For Baptist Heritage Sunday, this sermon explores the many ways Baptists have served in the world, and how we go about our business there. We Baptists have long grappled with major social issues, seeking God’s will through the Holy Spirit’s guidance on decisions like the end of slavery in the United States, the integration of freed slaves into society, women’s rights, and civil rights. Today we continue to seek God’s guidance in the challenges facing us. Like Barsabbas and Matthias, the vast majority of us do our work quietly behind the scenes.

Based on Acts 1:15-17, 21-26.

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Letter Carriers' Food Drive

On Saturday, May 9, our postal carriers are asking people of good will to set out bags of non-perishable food donations by your mail box. The postal carriers will then deliver these much needed groceries to local food banks for prompt stocking and distribution. There are far too many people in the United States currently suffering under conditions of "food insecurity," especially children. These children and their families simply do not have enough food available and, given their stressed circumstances, often do not know where their next meal is coming from. You can help food banks address this dire situation with your donations.

In Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, on Saturday, May 9, the Interfaith Food Cupboard at the First Presbyterian Church of Lansdowne, PA, will be looking for strong volunteers to help bring in the donated groceries as they arrive from these dedicated postal carriers. For more information about the Interfaith Food Cupboard, see: http://lansdownebaptistchurch.blogspot.com/2014/10/interfaith-food-cupboard-of-lansdowne.html

Thank you for your support. God bless you and your family.

Friday, February 27, 2015

American Baptist Identity - Don Ng





Who we are and where we are going as American Baptists. A message from the President of ABC USA. We are currently conducting an experiment ...




African American Baptists





We are a diverse people and a diverse congregation. Come and see. You are most welcome.

Short History of American Baptists





A very brief history of the American Baptists. We have a strong history of reaching out to others and supporting justice issues. Come and meet us this Sunday.

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Faith: What Is It?

Here are a few quotes on faith from great thinkers who will help us define faith for ourselves ... and perhaps desire it all the more. Growing faith is the process of a lifetime.

Faith is a living, daring confidence in God's grace, so sure and certain that a [person] stakes life on it a thousand times.

~Martin Luther

Faith is taking the first step, even when you don't see the whole staircase.
~Martin Luther King, Jr.

Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.
~Hebrews 11:1

Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”
~John 20:29

Faith is a matter of trust ... 

Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not rely on your own insight. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths.
~Proverbs 3:5-6

Now, finally, faith can be a little difficult to explain to others ...

To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.
~Thomas Aquinas

For a sermon that ties this all together, see: http://lansdownebaptistchurch.blogspot.com/2015/01/life-interrupted.html

What to Leave Behind to Follow Jesus

In Mark 1:14-20, Jesus calls four fishermen from the Sea of Galilee to follow him and come fish for people. These four disciples left their livelihood behind, their families, their daily routine for the unknown when called by Jesus. We are not called to quite so much. In fact, God can make great use of us at home and work. However, as mentioned in The Interpreter's Bible commentary, there are a few things we need to discard when following Jesus. Answering Jesus' call to come follow, we should discard like an old, worn out, ruined fishing net our old prejudices--the ones so familiar and easy to get along with out of long use; our "recumbent inertia" (such a wonderful turn of phrase); our aversion to the pain of new ideas; and our self-determination, which makes us so reluctant to follow where Jesus would have us go. Add to that all of our "what if" fears of what might happen if we follow Jesus. Replace those with active faith and follow. It will be a great adventure, with many surprising twists and turns along the way. 

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Day of Service

If you live in the greater Philadelphia area and are hoping to take part in a public service project for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service, Monday, January 19, see the following link for opportunities available throughout the region: http://www.mlkdayofservice.org/ 

May you find great blessings in helping others on the Day of Service, and throughout the year.

Monday, December 1, 2014

What Is Advent?

Welcome to the season of Advent, the beginning of the new church year. Advent, comprised of the four weeks prior to Christmas, is a season when we remember all God has done for us. We look back to the newness God brought into the world with the First Advent, the birth of Jesus. How Jesus’ entry into our world changed everything! It is the season when we look ahead to Jesus’ return and the reign of peace and justice that will come in that much anticipated Second Advent.

Over these four weeks, we light the candles of the Advent wreath. The evergreen wreath reminds us of God’s eternal love for us all. The four candles around the wreath represent hope, love, joy, and peace. The central candle, the last to be lit, represents Jesus Christ, who was sent by God to bring us hope, love, joy, and peace. It is a beautiful reminder of all Jesus has done for us and all that will yet be done. God bless you in this wonderful, meaningful season of Advent.

Friday, November 21, 2014

Recommended Reading for Clarity


There is a lot of confusion out there today about Christianity and the Bible, where the Bible came from, how it is interpreted, what it has to say about specific topics, and more. Here are a few books that will provide some clarity for the truly curious.

For an introduction to the faith, try:

Nouwen, Henri J.M. Life of the Beloved. Spiritual Living in a Secular World. New York: The Crossroad Publishing Company, 1992.

To come to grips with the powerful love of God for humanity, read:

Nouwen, Henri J.M. The Return of the Prodigal Son: A Story of Homecoming. New York: Doubleday, 1994.

To approach the Bible with insight and clarity, the following are suggested:

Brash, Donald J. The Indispensable Guide to God's Word. Cleveland, Ohio: The Pilgrim Press, 2010.
Davis, Ellen F. & Richard B. Hays, eds. The Art of Reading Scripture. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2003.

To better understand where the sixty-six book library of the Bible came from and what a great stretch of time is covered in those books, see:

Lightfoot, Neil R. How We Got the Bible. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Books, 1963, 1988, 2003.

Tackling some of the most challenging passages from the apostle Paul is:

Brauch, Manfred T. Hard Sayings of Paul. Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press, 1989.

To understand the complex imagery used in the Bible, and to understand slavery in biblical terms, read:

Ryken, Leland, James C. Wilhoit, and Tremper Longman III, eds. Dictionary of Biblical Imagery: An Encyclopedic Exploration of the Images, Symbols, Motifs, Metaphors, Figures of Speech, and Literary Patterns of the Bible. Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press USA, 1998.

To grapple with the relationship of slaves with Christianity in the Antebellum South, read;

Raboteau, Albert J. Slave Religion: The "Invisible Institution" in the Antebellum South. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1978, 2004.

Please see the bibliographies of all of the above sources for additional reference material.

For the history of the American Baptist Churches USA denomination, including our fight against the vile historical institution of slavery in the U.S., read:

http://www.abc-usa.org/what_we_believe/our-history/

To understand how American Baptist Churches USA fights modern day human trafficking (slavery) today, read:

http://www.abc-usa.org/2013/12/12/abhms-endorses-iccrs-statement-against-human-trafficking/

Finally, if you wish to use study Bibles to dig deeper, see:

Coogan, Michael D., ed. The New Oxford Annotated Bible. New Revised Standard Version. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Since there are a number of sermons available on this site, if you would like some understanding on what is involved in creating a weekly sermon, read:

Allen, Ronald J. Patterns of Preaching: A Sermon Sampler. St. Louis, Missouri: Chalice Press, 1998.

and

Tizon, Al. Missional Preaching: Engage, Embrace, Transform. Valley Forge, Pennsylvania: Judson Press, 2012.


Wednesday, August 27, 2014

True Happiness Can Be Ours ... Really!


What do you know of happiness? It's written into the Declaration of Independence as something the individual is free to pursue ... but what is it, really?

In the nuts and bolts definition department, happiness is subjective; it is a determination that a person's current situation and concept of the good life are getting along nicely. True happiness comes from positive relationships, not stuff and not special places to go. In fact, to be truly happy, you need to make other people happy (Bible verses abound). Happiness is a byproduct of a life well lived with others, reaching out that helping hand, lifting up the folks around you, and being willing to accept others attempts to make you happy (accept the compliment graciously, don't be too proud to humbly accept help offered out of the goodness of another's heart)! Above all, true happiness can never come at the expense of others. Real happiness has a very moral component.

Happiness as so defined will elude those who seek it in consumerism (sorry advertisers), in fleeting and ephemeral pleasure/thrill seeking, and ruthless competition for limited resources against others in a pitched battle for dominance. No long-term happiness there. See how countercultural happiness has become?

Viewing happiness through this lens, unhappiness can become a very useful gauge of what is going on in the world around you. If a person is persistently, chronically unhappy, it's time for the individual to look around and assess his or her relationships with others. Has too much time been spent at the office? Have social relations with friends and family deteriorated? Has too much emphasis been placed on the next shiny thing or the accumulation of wealth for its own sake? Be objective here with your subjective state ... you'll learn something useful.

On a larger scale, if unhappiness exists and persists in a group you are a part of or a group near you, it is likely that group is suffering from some sort of injustice or abuse ... and could use a helping hand.

Returning to that nuts and bolts definition, it seems to me that if your concept of the good life is skewed to either the bright and shiny thing end or to the I must martyr myself for others end, happiness will always elude you. Happiness as defined and explored here requires resetting that concept of the good life to include positive relationships with others. This leads me to a fascinating link with the Old and New Testaments. In both, righteousness is defined as being in right relations with God and each other. It's about loving others as self, being willing to serve others (and humble enough to be served), and having faith enough to trust others. So, I guess, the righteous person in the Bible is a happy person, not a hectoring, forbidding person.

For more, see the Dictionary of Pastoral Care and Counseling, p. 494.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Stance on Mental Health


In the twenty-first century, there remains far too much disinformation about and fear of mental illness. Please take some time to prayerfully consider the resolution of the American Baptist Churches USA concerning mental illness and our role in helping others be healthy and ensuring we all have a healthy understanding of the issues involved.

See: http://www.abc-usa.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/mentill.pdf

Sunday, August 10, 2014

New Flyer to Introduce LBC

We have taken our 4th of July flyer and used it as a template for a new flyer for the Lansdowne Baptist Church.  This we have adjusted and updated to put our best foot forward. Now we are putting on our thinking caps to see just how many ways we can make use of it. So far, we have copies for visitors to the church and it has appeared at the National Night Out. Now, it is here for you to review. Who knows what will happen next???

Page 1

Page 2
Of course, if you really want to get to know us, drop by any Sunday and meet us personally. I believe you will be glad you did!

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Bible Verses to Live By

For Christians, the Bible is our foundation, the library of books through which God tells us of God's love for us. That love is best expressed through Jesus Christ. We learn about Jesus and what Jesus had to say about God, God's love for humanity, and God's plan for us all best through the books of the Bible. There are great truths to be found among the 66 books of both the Old and New Testament--for the careful reader. There are times in life when certain passages will speak to faithful readers as they never have before and will provide valuable guidance. 

Here are some verses you might find useful: 

Jesus tells us about those who are blessed by God's standards rather than our own: 


Matthew 5:1-12: When Jesus saw the crowds, he went up the mountain; and after he sat down, his disciples came to him. Then he began to speak, and taught them, saying:
“Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
“Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted.
“Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth.
“Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.
“Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy.
“Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God.
“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.
“Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
“Blessed are you when people revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you."
Jesus also reminds us who we should love: 


Matthew 5:43-48: “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the righteous and on the unrighteous. For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? And if you greet only your brothers and sisters, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect."

Jesus states who we should forgive ... and why. Please note here that Jesus used humor to make points for his hearers ... something we worked hard to forget for hundreds of years and are now coming, fortunately, to rediscover and with hope lighten up a bit ourselves.: 

Matthew 7:1-5: Do not judge, so that you may not be judged. For with the judgment you make you will be judged, and the measure you give will be the measure you get.  Why do you see the speck in your neighbor's eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye? Or how can you say to your neighbor, "Let me take the speck out of your eye," while the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you can see clearly to take the speck out of your neighbor's eye.
Jesus has some sage advice about great wealth: 


Matthew 6:19-21: “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust consume and where thieves break in and steal; but store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust consumes and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also."

Jesus also has some very useful advice on worry ... which we all struggle to follow with varying degrees of success to be completely honest: 

Matthew 6:25-34: “Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air; they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? And can any of you by worrying add a single hour to your span of life? And why do you worry about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not clothed like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which is alive today and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith? Therefore do not worry, saying, ‘What will we eat?’ or ‘What will we drink?’ or ‘What will we wear?’ For it is the Gentiles who strive for all these things; and indeed your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things. But strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well."
“So do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worries of its own. Today’s trouble is enough for today."
Here is a story of deep faith, in which a Centurion, a soldier of the occupying Roman army, meets Jesus and surprises him with his deep and abiding faith: 


Matthew 8:5-13: When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, appealing to him and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, in terrible distress.” And he said to him, “I will come and cure him.” The centurion answered, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.” When Jesus heard him, he was amazed and said to those who followed him, “Truly I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I tell you, many will come from east and west and will eat with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the heirs of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you according to your faith.” And the servant was healed in that hour.
Jesus tells us our greatest of all the commandments are based on love ... and in the parable of the Good Samaritan we learn that our neighbor can be anyone, even an enemy:  
Matthew 22:34-40: When the Pharisees heard that he had silenced the Sadducees, they gathered together, and one of them, a lawyer, asked him a question to test him. “Teacher, which commandment in the law is the greatest?” He said to him, “ ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ This is the greatest and first commandment. And a second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.”
And finally, for now, from the beautiful language of the Old Testament prophet Isaiah, we are called to work for justice, that we may be the restorers of the streets where we live: 

Isaiah 58:6-12: Is not this the fast that I choose: to loose the bonds of injustice, to undo the thongs of the yoke, to let the oppressed go free, and to break every yoke? Is it not to share your bread with the hungry, and bring the homeless poor into your house; when you see the naked, to cover them, and not to hide yourself from your own kin?Then your light shall break forth like the dawn, and your healing shall spring up quickly; your vindicator shall go before you, the glory of the Lord shall be your rear guard. Then you shall call, and the Lord will answer; you shall cry for help, and he will say, Here I am. If you remove the yoke from among you, the pointing of the finger, the speaking of evil, if you offer your food to the hungry and satisfy the needs of the afflicted, then your light shall rise in the darkness and your gloom be like the noonday. The Lord will guide you continually, and satisfy your needs in parched places, and make your bones strong; and you shall be like a watered garden, like a spring of water, whose waters never fail. Your ancient ruins shall be rebuilt; you shall raise up the foundations of many generations; you shall be called the repairer of the breach, the restorer of streets to live in. 
All of these verses may be applied directly to life in the modern world. Working for justice, having strong faith, freedom from fear and judgment of others, freedom from greed, knowing who we should love, forgive, and accept forgiveness from, and knowing who is blessed by God's standards, all of these things are ours in these few verses. There is a lot more to be had in those 66 books of the Bible, a great deal of which will provide the reader with joy. 

God bless you as you adventure among the Scriptures.  

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Why Do Baptists Baptize?

While most Baptist churches have heated baptismal pools installed,
sometimes we have been known to head down to the river!
For us Baptists, "believer’s baptism" has always been central to the Baptist witness. By "believer's baptism" we mean that, for ourselves, only those who are mature enough to learn about Jesus and Jesus’ commandments, to understand them to an extent (understanding continues to grow throughout a believer's life), and accept them for themselves may be baptized. That baptism is a public profession of faith in what God is already doing inside the believer, redeeming that person through Jesus. Baptism also becomes the gateway into the church of God’s saints. It is a beautiful service our whole church community celebrates, in which the pastor submerges the person baptized into a pool of water and raises that person back up (right away), following the example Jesus set for us by his baptism in the river Jordan, as described in the Bible in Mark 1:4-11: 

4John the baptizer appeared in the wilderness, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. 5And people from the whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem were going out to him, and were baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins.6Now John was clothed with camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. 7He proclaimed, “The one who is more powerful than I is coming after me; I am not worthy to stoop down and untie the thong of his sandals. 8I have baptized you with water; but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.” 
9In those days Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. 10And just as he was coming up out of the water, he saw the heavens torn apart and the Spirit descending like a dove on him. 11And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”

Our Baptist name comes from this penchant for baptism. It was first given to us as a negative name, in the same way Christian, meaning “little Christs” was given to followers of Jesus at first to shame them. In both cases, to their credit, believers stubbornly accepted the names and made them their own.

For Baptists, that plunge into the water represents the death of the old sinner and the rebirth of the new follower of Jesus. The journey begins with teaching, which blooms into faith, turns into the public witness of baptism, and continues with the gathered, faithful witnesses and all the saints of the church who have gone before us. 

Friday, June 13, 2014

Who Is Jesus?

American Baptist Churches USA, our denomination, states, "American Baptists celebrate the fact that belief in Jesus Christ assures salvation and eternal fellowship with a loving God. The events of the first Easter week are the cornerstones of our faith: the death of Christ, in which He took upon Himself the sin of the world, and the Resurrection, which gave proof of His triumph over sin and death. Holy Scripture always has been for American Baptists the authoritative and trustworthy guide for knowing and serving the God who is revealed as Creator, Savior and Advocate."

Henri Nouwen, in this devotional book, Bread for the Journey, gives admirable insight into one facet of Jesus. On page 63, he states,

“Jesus, the Blessed One, is gentle. Even though he speaks with great fervor and biting criticism against all forms of hypocrisy and is not afraid to attack deception, vanity, manipulation, and oppression, his heart is a gentle heart. He won’t break the crushed reed or snuff the faltering wick (see Matthew 12:20). He responds to people’s suffering, heals their wounds, and offers courage to the fainthearted.

Jesus came to bring good news to the poor, sight to the blind, and freedom to prisoners (see Luke 4:18-19) in all he says, and thus he reveals God’s immense compassion. As his followers, we are called to the same gentleness.”

Christians are to follow Jesus' example, approaching the world with Jesus' gentle heart. 

Jesus also guides us to the two greatest commandments, to love God with all our heart, soul, strength, and mind, and to love our neighbors as ourselves. In the parable of the "Good Samaritan," we learn by the kind actions of the Samaritan, an enemy of the people of Israel, when he helped a wounded Israeli, that our neighbors are everyone who needs us. It's a very all inclusive love we are to offer. 

Jesus is a friend of sinners, a blazer of trails for us to follow, a wonderful teacher who used humor to make his points and memorable stories known as parables, a controversial character who had little patience for those who quibbled over the letter of the law while entirely missing the law's spirit, and Jesus is shown as the true shepherd of the sheep, willing to lay down his life for the beloved flock (all of us). Jesus is our savior. Through his actions he closed the gap humanity had created between us and God when we refused  to love God, who loves us. 

Now, I could go on and on. However, I suspect you might find that just overwhelming. There is no end of what might be said about Jesus. Instead, I recommend getting to know Jesus for yourself through the Bible, which tells us best who Jesus is and what he intends for us all. 

The other thing you can do is ask believers for stories of what Jesus has meant in their lives. There you will find some wonderful insights into what Jesus means to believers who have dedicated their lives to Jesus. You can find one example of such a story right here on this blog site: http://lansdownebaptistchurch.blogspot.com/2014/06/statement-of-faith.html

Jesus wants to develop a personal relationship with you, today. Jesus is calling to you. Will you respond?

We also invite you to visit us, worship with us, and come to know Jesus through our community. We welcome you. 

For a post about Jesus changing expectations, see: http://lansdownebaptistchurch.blogspot.com/2014/04/sermon-summaries-palm-sunday-king-of.html

Friday, April 4, 2014

American Baptist Churches USA Serving as the Hands and Feet of Christ (+...





Here is an excellent, brief introduction to who we are as American Baptists. If you want to learn more, please join us on Sunday mornings here at Lansdowne Baptist Church and explore the faith together with us as we worship.



For more information on American Baptist history and belief, you may also see: http://www.abc-usa.org/10facts/