Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Beyond Loaves and Fishes: Micah Week 3







This week we picked up with Chapter 2. There will be lots of material about human downfall and what we must do to walk with God instead of stumbling along in the dark being miserable. We ended with Chapter 4. It was a wild ride. You are all invited.

Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Anit-Racism Resources

If you are looking for resources that will allow you to fight racism that is so badly harming our communities across the nation and around the world, please follow this link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BRlF2_zhNe86SGgHa6-VlBO-QgirITwCTugSfKie5Fs/preview?fbclid=IwAR28P0Fj1Q45vWf7bcIBZDYnyK27Q3Wm0Sz2ZWoD-k30aWnUhibuOXNsPjA&pru=AAABcncwwWM%2Ag_ZhqwgXau1saPP5XcsvoA

ABC USA Letter Refuting Racial Injustice

What follows is a letter from American Baptist Churches USA dealing with the chaos that has occurred as a response to racism following the violent death of George Floyd: 


Dear American Baptists,

The death of George Floyd has caused widespread pain, rage, protests, and violence in Minneapolis and across the United States. I appreciate the input received from officers of the Regional Executive Ministers Council, members of the National Executive Council, and others in constructing a response to this event. While American Baptists have never advocated violence, we grieve with those feeling the pent-up pain from years of racial discrimination and injustice. The horrifying video captured at the corner of Chicago Avenue and 38th Street in Minneapolis has released years of frustration that can never be fully understood by those who have not consistently lived with injustice historically and presently.

Acts of current racial injustice as well as the effects of historic racial injustices have been brought into the light in recent weeks as we recognize that African-Americans have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. In a recent study, the Centers for Disease Control found that 45% of individuals for whom race or ethnicity data was available were white, compared to 55% of individuals in the surrounding community and that 33% of hospitalized patients were black compared to 18% in the community. Unequal access to healthcare, jobs, education, and training have all been influenced by the racialized society in which we continue to live.

Unfortunately, acts of violence have been cast upon many ethnically distinct groups within our congregations and among our international partners. Many Chinese as well as Asian-Americans are being targeted, harassed, and even physically attacked because of comments made about COVID-19. In Malaysia, we are hearing reports of the government using information collected from the treatment of persons affected by COVID-19 for deportation despite earlier statements that no one who sought medical services for the coronavirus would be arrested based on their immigration status.

Racism and Xenophobia have deep roots in American history and culture and wrongs cannot be righted overnight. While expeditious action is critical to the pursuit of justice for George Floyd, dialogue, conversation, systemic change, and continued acts of justice to curb the sources of prejudice and discrimination are needed.

In these tense times of ache and agony and stinging memories of bias and wrongdoing, we are called again to combat racism and resist violence. American Baptists have historically advocated against both violence as well as racial injustice. “Our denominational history is rich with resistance against violence. From Roger Williams speaking in defense of First Nations People, to the Abolitionists, down to Walter Rauschenbusch, and Martin Luther King, American Baptists in particular have been on the forefront for the cessation of violence and the coming of Shalom.” (American Baptist Case Statement on Violence from the 2015 Mission Table). I am calling on people of faith to find the resources of the Spirit to calm their anger. “Lead a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, making every effort to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.” (Ephesians 4:1-3, NASV)

Our denominational history is also rich in working toward justice in general and racial justice in particular. “Racial justice,” as defined in our 1989 ABCUSA policy statement, “is recognizing our oneness in Christ, confessing that we have not become what God wants us to be, and committing ourselves to pressing on to that mark of high calling by which we can become a liberating symbol to our nation and world of what it means to be the people of God. In so doing, we can challenge our nation to live up to its high purposes.”

“Thus says the Lord: Stand at the crossroads, and look, and ask for the ancient paths, where the good way lies; and walk in it, and find rest for your souls.” (Jeremiah 6:16, NASV) I charge our American Baptist family to continue to search, advocate, and live where the good way lies.

Dr. C. Jeff Woods
Interim General Secretary
American Baptist Churches USA

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Beyond Loaves and Fishes: Micah Week 2






After last week's introduction to the Old Testament prophets and how
their jobs changed over 1000+ years, we now turn to the prophet Micah
and what he had to say about Israel, power, corruption, downfall, and
hope. It will be a wild ride. You are invited.

Friday, May 22, 2020

Join Us This Sunday, 5/24/2020, Online for Worship

All are invited:

Come and join us for Sunday worship when we continue our sermon series covering the fruit of the Spirit (this week we're exploring peace and where to find it in turbulent times) and honoring our service men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice to protect our freedoms. Stay safe and join us at www.facebook.com/LansdowneBaptistChurch at 11 a.m. East Coast time.

For all of you who feel the work of this church is vital to the community and the world, we appreciate your financial support of our ministries. To contribute to our mission, you may send checks to the following address: Lansdowne Baptist Church, 17 E. LaCrosse Avenue, Lansdowne, PA 19050. 

God bless you all.  ~Pastor Jeff Snyder

Thursday, May 21, 2020

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Bible Study: Micah, Week 1



This week we begin our exploration of the Old Testament Prophets with
the minor prophet Micah. We begin with a review of the history of the
prophets and where Micah comes in the long line of prophets that spans
1000+ years of the history of Israel. The job changed over the centuries as
the fortunes of the Israelite's changed. What does any of that have
to do with us. Come and see.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Join Us This Sunday, May 10, 2020

https://www.facebook.com/LansdowneBaptistChurch/videos/588350805116441/

Come and join us for Sunday worship when we begin a new sermon series and honors our mothers for Mother's Day as well. Stay safe and join us at www.facebook.com/LansdowneBaptistChurch at 11 a.m. East Coast time.

Bible Study: Mark, Week 16



On Tuesday night, May 5, 2020, we completed our study of the book of Mark. Focusing on the crucifixion and resurrection, and what it means for us.

Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Pastors: ABC USA Best Practices Recommendations

These are incredibly difficult times for everyone. Pastors are facing unique challenges that go against our inclinations to reach out, help, and comfort directly, being present for our beloved congregations and communities. Here, however, are the best practices recommendations from our denomination, American Baptist Churches USA (ABC USA). 

VALLEY FORGE, PA (4/15/20)—The Regional Executive Ministers Council (REMC) of American Baptist Churches USA has released a new document, “REMC Recommended Best Practices for Pastors During the COVID-19 Crisis”.
The best practices recommended by the REMC touch on worship services, memorial services, weddings, and pastoral care.
Read the “REMC Recommended Best Practices for Pastors During the COVID-19 Crisis” below of view a PDF document.

April 2020
REMC Recommended Best Practices for Pastors During the COVID-19 Crisis:
The following are recommendations for American Baptist Pastors during this time of the COVID-19 crisis and restrictions.
Traditional pastoral ministry has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 crisis and government Stay at Home directives. It has changed the way we worship, fellowship and provide pastoral care. In general, there are to be no groups of ten or more people.
  1. Worship services should not be held in person. Services should be held by Facebook, streaming, and video conference.
  2. Memorial services should be restricted to immediate family members of ten or less people. Larger services should be planned for after social distancing restrictions have been lifted.
  3. Wedding services should be restricted to immediate family members of ten or less people. Larger celebrations and/or receptions should be planned for after social distancing restrictions have been lifted.
  4. Pastoral calls to those in the hospital, nursing homes, and shut-ins should be postponed until after social distancing restrictions have been lifted.
  5. People in hospitals, nursing homes, and shut-ins are considered at high risk of being infected with the virus.
  6. Pastoral care must take on other expressions: greeting cards, phone calls, email, texting, Face Timing, and other creative ways to be present.
  7. The ministry of prayer has been become even more important.
  8. RESOURCES:
    Best Practices for Funerals During the COVID-19 Crisis ABC USA Resources: www.abc-usa.org/coronavirus
The membership of the Regional Executive Ministers Council includes the chief executive officer of each region entering into covenant with the American Baptist Churches USA (33 in total) and the General Secretary.
American Baptist Churches USA is one of the most diverse Christian denominations today, with approximately 5,000 congregations comprised of 1.3 million members, across the United States and Puerto Rico, all engaged in God’s mission around the world.